Registration for Open Mind/#WOW events will be available one month prior to the event. Invitations will be sent to everyone on The Friends mailing list. To join our mailing list, email Wendy Kelman at: wkelman@mednet.ucla.edu

VIRTUAL OPEN MIND

 

Open Mind Film Screening

MTV Documentary Film Each and Every Day

MTV Documentary Films’ Each and Every Day from the Peabody® Award-winning filmmaker Alexandra Shiva in partnership with The Jed Foundation profiles nine young people who have attempted suicide or had suicidal ideations as they share their experiences and the ways they have sought help. The nine subjects, who span across race, ethnic, religious, socio-economic and regional background, share their personal stories in an intimate and engaging conversation that goes deep into the fastest-growing epidemic among teens and young adults today. Audiences not only hear their stories of depression, anxiety and other mental health concerns, but importantly see the uplifting message of hope, recovery and the importance of treatment and honest conversation. 

 

A panel discussion about teen suicide prevention and mental health challenges during the pandemic will immediately follow the screening of the film that has a running time of 1 hour.

 

Panelists (in alphabetical order):

Joan Asarnow, PhD, Professor of Psychiatry and Biobehavioral Sciences at the David Geffen School of Medicine, Director of the Youth Stress and Mood Program, and Director of the SAMHSA-funded Center for Trauma Informed Suicide and Self-Harm Treatment and Prevention. Her current research, teaching, and clinical work focus on the development, evaluation, and dissemination of treatments for depression, self-harm, and suicide prevention in children and adolescents. She specializes in cognitive-behavioral and patient and family centered treatments and has done extensive work bringing evidence-based treatments to primary care and emergency department settings.

 

Sheila Nevins, Executive Producer, currently serves as an Executive Producer at MTV Networks. She is the former president of HBO Documentary Films and Family Programming where she was responsible for overseeing the development and production of more than 1500 programs for HBO, HBO2 and Cinemax. As an executive producer or producer, she has received 32 Primetime Emmy® Awards, 35 News and Documentary Emmys® and 42 George Foster Peabody Awards.  During her tenure, HBO’s critically acclaimed documentaries won 26 Academy Awards®. Sheila has been honored with numerous prestigious career achievement awards, including the 2018 Realscreen Legacy Award, the 2017 DOC NYC Lifetime Achievement Award and the Governor's Award from the Academy of Television Arts & Sciences.  She won the first George Foster Peabody Award ever presented to a cable program for "She’s Nobody’s Baby", which was produced with Ms. Magazine.   She is also the New York Times bestselling author of You Don’t Look Your Age… and Other Fairy Tales.

 

Alexandra Shiva, Director, is an award-winning filmmaker, known for crafting intimate character-driven cinema verite documentaries. Her previous film, THIS IS HOME, a portrait of four Syrian refugee families arriving in Baltimore, Maryland, struggling to find their footing, premiered at The Sundance Film Festival in 2018 and won the Audience Award for World Cinema Documentary. Prior to that, her film, HOW TO DANCE IN OHIO, followed a group of teenagers and young adults on the autism spectrum as they prepared for an iconic American rite of passage — a Spring Formal. The Peabody Award winning film premiered at The Sundance Film Festival in 2015, aired on HBO to great critical acclaim and The Friends of Semel proudly screened it for an Open Mind program in 2016.  Alexandra’s other documentaries include, STAGEDOOR (2006), a film that follows kids through musical theater summer camp in the Catskills, and BOMBAY EUNUCH (2001), her directorial debut about a makeshift family of eunuchs struggling to survive in India. Alexandra is a member of The Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences and a graduate of Vassar College. 

 

Victor Schwartz, MD, Medical Advisor to EACH AND EVERY DAY is the founder of Mind Strategies, an organization that provides specialized advising, educational programming, suicide prevention, and mental health support for schools, colleges, and organizations. Dr. Schwartz previously served as the chief medical officer of The Jed Foundation, a leading non-profit focused on youth and young adult suicide prevention and mental health promotion for 8 years. While at JED, Dr. Schwartz was a highly sought-after advisor and consultant and was a leader in developing approaches to messaging to young people about mental health and helping organizations develop their mental health activities and programming. Previously, he was university dean of students at Yeshiva University for six years after establishing and serving as director of that institution's Counseling Center. He is currently clinical associate professor of psychiatry at NYU School of Medicine. Prior to his time at Yeshiva, Dr. Schwartz was medical director and chief psychiatrist at the NYU Student Counseling Service. He also served as assistant director of residency training in psychiatry at NYU Medical Center.

Tuesday, April 27

5:00 - 6:30 PM PT

Registration is required for this free live private Zoom event.

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For questions email WKelman@mednet.ucla.edu

 

Open Mind Film Festival

The inaugural Open Mind Film Festival is presented by The Friends of the Semel Institute at UCLA. High school students from across the United States have submitted scores of films highlighting their experiences and concerns about mental health. These short films (mostly under 4 minutes) tell stories about family problems, isolation, eating disorders, suicide, and more. All were made this year under challenging pandemic conditions.

At this virtual festival, the films which were chosen as finalists by our judges will be screened. In addition there will be a panel discussion with several filmmakers to discuss their ideas for using film to tell stories about mental health and to help reduce the stigma associated with mental illness. The festival will conclude with a presentation of the first Open Mind Film Festival Awards.  The nine films to be screened are:

 

Filters of Life by Angelica Rubio

Golden Valley High School - Merced, CA

 

Delirium by Joe Grode

Harvard-Westlake School - North Hollywood, CA

 

Growing Up COVID by Rylee Landau

Fieldston High School - The Bronx, NY

 

Delusions by Rebecca Anton

Frank Sinatra School of the Arts - Queens, NY

 

With Love by Mily Patton

Mission Vista High School - Oceanside, CA

 

Keep Breathing by Gabriella Hsu

Colleyville Heritage High School - Colleyville, TX

 

Bloom by Talia Jacnuk

Sage Hill High School - Newport Coast, CA

 

Reflections by Harlow Schuman

Viewpoint High School - Calabasas, CA

 

Suburbia by Jennifer Li

Beverly Hills High School - Beverly Hills, CA


AJ Mendez, New York Times best selling author, mental health advocate, animal rights activist, and Friends Board member, will host the festival. Our judges are:

 

Robert Bilder, PhD, Director of UCLA’s Tennenbaum Center for the Biology of Creativity, head of the Mind Well pod in UCLA’s Healthy Campus Initiative; and involved in studies of the behavioral traits associated with exceptional creativity.

 

Kristy Guevara Flanagan, Associate Professor at UCLA’s School of Theatre, Film and Television and head of MFA Directing Documentary concentration, who has also produced award-winning documentary films.

 

Brett Rapkin, Emmy Award-winning producer, writer and director; founder and President of Podium Pictures, a production company focused on impact sports films; and writer and producer (in partnership with Michael Phelps) of The Weight of Gold, a documentary about mental health and Olympic athletes.

Please join us to view the films and to meet the next generation of filmmakers who share their stories.

Thursday, May 6

5:00  PM PT

Registration is required for this free live private Zoom event.

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For questions email OpenMindFilmFest@gmail.com

VIRTUAL OPEN MIND

 

Open Mind Lecture

Where Reasons End

Professor Yiyun Li with Michael Gitlin, MD

In this imagined dialogue between mother and child in a timeless world, author Yiyun Li, meets life’s deepest sorrows.  Composed in the months after she lost a child to suicide, Where Reasons End, winner of the 2020 Pen/JeanStein Book Award, trespasses into the space between life and death, as mother and child talk, free from old images and narratives. Deeply moving, these conversations portray the love and complexity in a relationship across generations. Written with great originality and poetic beauty, Where Reasons End confronts inescapable pain, in a moving work suffused with intimacy and fierce love.

Yiyun Li, the author of The Vagrants and other acclaimed books, is the recipient of many awards, including a PEN/Hemingway Award, a PEN/Jean Stein Book Award, a MacArthur Foundation fellowship, and a Windham-Campbell Prize, and was featured in The New Yorker’s “20 Under 40” fiction issue.

Dr. Yiyun Li is also a professor of creative writing at Princeton.  She will be joined in discussion by Dr. Michael Gitlin, Distinguished Professor of Clinical Psychiatry at the UCLA School of Medicine, Director of the Adult Division in the Department of Psychiatry and Medical Director of the Neuropsychiatric Behavioral Health Services and Director of the Mood Disorder Clinical at the Resnick Hospital.

Wednesday, May 12

 5:00 - 6:00 PM PT

Registration is required for this free live private Zoom event.

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For questions email WKelman@mednet.ucla.edu

UCLA
Friends of the Semel Institute and
Resnick Neuropsychiatric Hospital Board of Advisors
cordially invite you to attend

Virtual Event
Thursday, May 13, 2021
5:00 p.m. – 6:00 p.m. PT

Lisa Kudrow, Host

featuring

Landon Donovan, Ava DuVernay,

Mindy Kaling, Dolly Parton, Dan Wakeford,

Preeminent UCLA doctors and researchers, and more

honoring

Nancy Glaser, M.D.

Founding Chair

Resnick Neuropsychiatric Hospital Board of Advisors

and

Vicky Goodman

Founder and President

The Friends of the Semel Institute

Information_and_Tickets.png
 

VIRTUAL OPEN MIND

 

Open Mind Lecture
Exercised: Why Something We Never
Evolved to Do is Healthy and Rewarding

Daniel E. Lieberman, PhD with

Barbara Natterson-Horowitz, MD

What is the relationship between physical activity and brain size? Why is
exercise so good for mental and physical health but also so unpopular? In
this two-part talk, Dr. Daniel Lieberman will first discuss the role of moderate and vigorous physical activities and the evolution of human brain size tomake the argument that humans’ exceptionally large brains are in part theresult of selection for the ability to engage in endurance physical activitiesincluding long-distance running. In the second part of his talk, he willdiscuss why physical activity is also important for maintaining brain healthand make the case that humans evolved to engage in moderate lifelongphysical activity when it was necessary and rewarding, but otherwiseconserve limited calories. As a result, we never evolved to exercise—that isdo discretionary physical activity for the sake of health and fitness—but thatthe absence of regular, lifelong physical activity fails to activate importantrepair and maintenance mechanisms that are important for neural health.As a result, habitual physical inactivity increases our vulnerability to a rangeof diseases.

Dr. Daniel Lieberman received degrees from Harvard and Cambridge
University, and taught at Rutgers University and George Washington
University before joining the Harvard Faculty in 2001. He studies and teaches how and why the human body is the way it is, and how our evolutionary history affects health and disease. He is best known for his research on the evolution of the head and on the evolution of running and walking, which he studies by combining experimental biomechanics, anatomy, and physiology both in the lab and in the field. He has conducted research in Africa for almost 30 years, and now also works in Mexico. He loves teaching and has published well over 150 peer-reviewed papers, many in journals such as Nature, Science, and PNAS, as well as three popular books, The Evolution of the Human Head (2011), The Story of the Human Body: Evolution, Health and Disease (2013), and Exercised: Why Something We Never Evolved to Do is Healthy and Rewarding (2021). In his spare time, he enjoys running.

 

Barbara Natterson-Horowitz, MD, will join Dr. Lieberman in conversation.
Dr. Natterson-Horowitz is a cardiologist and evolutionary biologist on the
faculty of Harvard Medical School, Harvard University’s Department of
Human Evolutionary Biology and the Division of Cardiology at UCLA. Her
research focuses on the natural world as a source of insights into human
pathology and developmental challenges. Her New York Times bestseller,
Zoobiquity, co-written with Kathryn Bowers, was a Finalist in the American
Association for the Advancement of Science Excellence in Science Books
Award, a Smithsonian Top Book of 2012 and a Discover Magazine Best
Book of the Year. It has been translated into seven languages and has been
chosen as Common Read at universities across the country.

Tuesday, May 25

 5:00 - 6:00 PM PT

Registration is required for this free live private Zoom event.

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For questions email WKelman@mednet.ucla.edu

VIRTUAL OPEN MIND

 

Open Mind Lecture

The Rabbit Effect

Kelli Harding, MD with Daniel Fessler, PhD

In the past decade, medicine has seen significant biomedical advances, yet, despite millions of research hours and trillions of dollars, Americans aren’t living longer or healthier lives. In this eye-opening book, Columbia University’s Dr. Kelli Harding asks, what are we missing when it comes to our health? Rabbits offer a clue. In 1978, a seemingly straightforward experiment found that kindness—in the form of an incredibly nurturing researcher who pet and spoke to the lab rabbits as she fed them—made all the difference to health outcomes.

 

Dr. Kelli Harding discovered the rabbits were just the beginning of a much larger story. Decades of research from academic institutions worldwide illustrate that love, friendship, community, life’s purpose, and our environment can have a far greater impact on our health than anything that happens in the doctor’s office.

 

The Rabbit Effect is an eye-opening and inspiring new way to look at our health based on the latest discoveries in the science of compassion, kindness, and human connection. With compelling storytelling and research, Dr. Harding presents an evidence-based framework for you to take charge of your health and happiness.  

 

This book comes at a time when Americans need it most. COVID-19 has made our world smaller, and our interconnectedness clear. The events of 2020 have amplified its message.  The Rabbit Effect offers practical daily tools to improve our health and increase kindness—especially in times that feel so divided. How we treat each other in our day-to-day lives is critical to immune function, metabolism, and the course of illness and how we live, work, and play profoundly impacts our health. 

 

Dr. Kelli Harding is an assistant clinical professor of psychiatry at Columbia University Irving Medical Center and public health expert. She’s a diplomat of the American Board of Psychiatry and Neurology and boarded in the specialty of psychosomatic (mind-body) medicine. Dr. Harding has spent much of her career in the ER at New York-Presbyterian Hospital. A media favorite, she’s appeared on TodayGood Morning America, BBC World, C-SPAN, NPR, and in The New York TimesThe Washington Post, MedscapeOprah.comReaders Digest, and Parents Magazine. Dr. Harding lives in NYC with her husband, Padraic, and three boys (seventh grade, fifth grade, and second grade).

 

Dr. Daniel Fessler, Director of the UCLA Bedari Kindness Center, will join Dr. Harding in conversation.  Dr. Fessler is a Professor of Biological Anthropology at UCLA, working in the fields of evolutionary psychology, evolutionary anthropology and evolutionary medicine. 

Thursday, June 3

 5:00 - 6:00 PM PT

Registration is required for this free live private Zoom event.

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For questions email WKelman@mednet.ucla.edu

VIRTUAL OPEN MIND

 

Open Mind Lecture

Wiser - The Scientific Roots of Wisdom, Compassion And What Makes Us Good

Dilip Jeste, MD with Shafali Jeste, MD

What exactly does it mean to be "wise?" And is it possible to grow―and even accelerate―its unfolding? How do you nurture wisdom within yourself, at any stage in life?   

If you seek to be a wiser person―with your family, at work, and in your community―you will not want to miss this special father-daughter Open Mind/#WOW program Wiser,  presented by The Friends of the Semel Institute for Neuroscience and Human Behavior at UCLA and the Resnick Neuropsychiatric Hospital Board of Advisors.

Dilip Jeste, M.D. is a world-renowned neuropsychiatrist and a pioneer in the exploration of the neurobiology and psychology.  For over two decades, Dr. Jeste, a Professor  of Psychiatry and Neurosciences and Director of the Center for Healthy Aging at the University of California San Diego,  has led the search for the biological and cognitive roots of wisdom. In his new critically acclaimed book Wiser:  The Scientific Roots of Wisdom, Compassion and What Makes Us Good, he shows you how you can take control of your life by increasing your wisdom.

Shafli Jeste, M.D., Pediatric Neurologist and Professor in Psychiatry, Pediatric, and Neurology at the David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, will join her renowned father in conversation. Dr. Jeste is the recipient of the 2019 Presidential Early Career Award for Scientists and Engineers.  Her research is focused on developing more precise methods for early prediction and diagnosis of neurodevelopmental disorders, including autism, using biomarkers, and other genetic information, with the ultimate goal of improving the timing and targets of treatment for these conditions. Dr. Jeste has just been named Chief of Neurology at Children’s Hospital Los Angeles and will begin her tenure there in July.  

Tuesday, June 15

5:00 - 6:00 PM PDT

Registration is required for this free live private Zoom event.

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For questions email WKelman@mednet.ucla.edu

VIRTUAL OPEN MIND

 

Open Mind Lecture

Hooked - Food, Free Will, and How the Food Giants Exploit our Addictions

Michael Moss

Please join The Friends of the Semel Institute for Neuroscience and Human Behavior at UCLA and the Resnick Neuropsychiatric Hospital Board of Advisors for an Open Mind program with Michael Moss, Pulitzer Prize-winning investigative reporter and author of Hooked - Food, Free Will, and How the Food Giants Exploit our Addictions.  In this powerful exposé, Moss explores the science of food addiction and how the processed food industry exploits our evolutionary instincts and legal loopholes in the name of profit over public health. 

 

Hooked is a sequel to Moss' #1 New York Times best-selling book Salt Sugar Fat - How the Food Giants Hooked Us that sold over 260,000 copies. In this book, Moss uncovers what the scientific and medical communities—as well as food manufacturers— already know: food can, in some cases, be even more addictive than alcohol, cigarettes, or drugs. Everyone knows how hard it can be to maintain a healthy diet. Moss goes on to show how the processed food industry—including major companies like Kraft, Heinz, Nestlé, and PepsiCo—has not only tried to evade this troubling discovery about the addictiveness of food, but to exploit it. Where Salt Sugar Fat exposed the marketing trickery that food corporations use to ensnare us, Hooked reveals the physiology and brain chemistry that leads us to become addicted to processed foods. 

 

A gripping account of the legal battles and cutting-edge food science that have brought us to our current public health crisis of astronomical obesity and diabetes rates, Hooked lays out all the ways that the food industry exploits and deepens our troubling eating habits. But Moss also shows us what we can do to retrain our brains to change what we value in food and seize control of our health. 

 

Michael Moss, formerly an investigative reporter with The New York Times, has been a featured guest on shows like CBS This Morning, Dr. Oz, CNN’s The Lead, All Things Considered, and The Daily Show. He was awarded the Pulitzer Prize for investigative reporting in 2013.  

Thursday, June 24

5:00 - 6:00 PM PDT

Registration is required for this free live private Zoom event.

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For questions email WKelman@mednet.ucla.edu

VIRTUAL OPEN MIND

 

Open Mind Lecture

This is Your Brain on Food

Uma Naidoo, MD with Zhaoping Li, MD, PhD

Dr. Uma Naidoo, a Harvard trained psychiatrist, Professional Chef and Nutrition Specialist is the author of the new book, This is Your Brain on Food released in August 2020. Her niche work is in Nutritional Psychiatry and she is regarded both nationally and internationally as a medical pioneer in this more newly recognized field.

 

In her book, she shows the cutting-edge science explaining the ways in which food contributes to our mental health and how a sound diet can help treat and prevent a wide range of psychological and cognitive health issues from ADHD to anxiety, depression, OCD, and others.

 

Featured in the Wall Street Journal, ABC News, Harvard Health Press, Goop, and many others, Dr Uma has a special interest on the impact of food on mood and other mental health conditions.

 

In her role as a Clinical Scientist, Dr. Naidoo founded and directs the first hospital-based clinical service in Nutritional Psychiatry in the US.  She is the Director of Nutritional and Lifestyle Psychiatry at Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) & Director of Nutritional Psychiatry at the Massachusetts General Hospital Academy while serving on the faculty at Harvard Medical School.

Zhaoping Li, MD, PhD, Professor of Medicine and Director for the UCLA Center for Human Nutrition,  will join Dr. Naidoo in conversation.  Dr. Li is also the Lynda and Stewart Resnick Endowed Chair in Human Nutrition and at the David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA

Thursday, September 9

 5:00 - 6:00 PM PT

Registration is required for this free live private Zoom event.

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For questions email WKelman@mednet.ucla.edu

VIRTUAL OPEN MIND

 

Open Mind Play

Does This Show Make Me Look Fat?

Cathy Ladman

“Does This Show Make Me Look Fat?” is the story of Cathy Ladman’s lifelong struggle to be perfect in every way – to succeed at school, to be seen at home, and, finally, to attain what she thinks is the perfect body.  But as much as she tries, nothing is ever enough. Faced with the possibility of hospital admission to prevent her from starving herself to death, she begins on a path to learn that “perfect” is not the thing she really wants. 

Cathy Ladman is one of the country's top comedians and was awarded the American Comedy Award for Best Female Stand-up Comic.  Her comedy focuses on family, growing up, relationships, and real life from a very personal perspective. The Los Angeles Times put it best: "...Ladman has such clever, well-written material and such a breezy, unassuming delivery that it would be easy to overlook just how good she is: Her act seems effortless." Her new one-woman show Does This Make Me Look Fat? is a self-probing, anxiety-venting vehicle, which draws laughter from exposing personal neurosis. 

 

A native New Yorker, now living in Los Angeles, Cathy's film credits include “Charlie Wilson’s War,” “The Aristocrats,” "White Oleander,” "What Planet Are You From?" "My Fellow Americans," and "Don't Tell Mom the Babysitter's Dead.” She has appeared on "The Tonight Show, The Late Late Show with Craig Ferguson, in her own HBO One Night Stand comedy special. Her guest-starring TV roles include “Modern Family,” “Curb Your Enthusiasm,” “How to Get Away with Murder,” “Scandal,” “NCIS: LA,” “Mad Men,” “Pretty Little Liars,” “Brothers and Sisters,” and "Everybody Loves Raymond." Her TV pilots include "Caroline in the City," and several others that never saw the light of day. She appeared regularly on ABC's "Politically Incorrect" and Comedy Central's "Dr. Katz: Professional Therapist."

 

Cathy’s writing career includes developing her own original projects, and she spent seasons writing on “Caroline in the City”, and “Roseanne.” She also wrote an episode of “King of Queens.” Cathy has also been doing more live theatre: She completed a successful run Off-Broadway in, “The JAP Show: The Princesses of Comedy;” she was in the 25th Anniversary Production of “Last Summer at Bluefish Cove” in Los Angeles, which was nominated for several GLAAD awards; she and HBO developed her solo show, “Scaredypants,” and took it to the Aspen Comedy Festival. She recently did a TEDMED talk which excerpted her show.

Thursday, September 23

 5:00 - 6:00 PM PT

Registration is required for this free live private Zoom event.

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For questions email WKelman@mednet.ucla.edu

VIRTUAL OPEN MIND

 

Open Mind Lecture

He Came In With It

Miriam Feldman with Nick Feldman and Yvonne S. Yang, MD, PhD

In an idyllic Los Angeles neighborhood, where generations of families enjoy deep roots in old homes, the O’Rourke family fits right in.

 

Miriam and Craig are both artists and their four children carry on the legacy. When their teenage son, Nick, is diagnosed with schizophrenia, a tumultuous decade ensues in which he family careens permanently off the conventional course.

 

Like the ten Biblical plagues, they are hit by one catastrophe after another; violence, evictions, arrests, a suicide attempt, a near-drowning, even cancer and a brain tumor play against the backdrop of a wild teenage bacchanal of artmaking and drugs. With no time for hand-wringing, Miriam advances, convinced she can fix everything. This is the story of how mental illness unspools an entire family. As Miriam fights to reclaim her son from the
ruthless, invisible enemy, we are given an unflinching view into a world few could imagine. He Came In With It is the legacy of, and for, her son Nick.

Yvonne S. Yang, MD, PhD will join Miriam Feldman in discussion.  Dr. Yang is Director, Psychosis Clinic, West Los Angeles VA; Section Chief, Psychosis Section, West Los Angeles VA; Assistant Clinical Professor, Semel Institute for Neuroscience and Human Behavior, UCLA; and past recipient of The Friends of Semel Chancellor Block Research Scholar Award.

Tuesday, October 5

 5:00 - 6:00 PM PT

Registration is required for this free live private Zoom event.

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For questions email WKelman@mednet.ucla.edu

VIRTUAL OPEN MIND

 

Open Mind Lecture

Floating in the Deep End - How Caregivers Can See Beyond Alzheimer's

Author Patti Davis in conversation with Linda Ercoli, PhD

"For the decade of my father's illness, I felt as I was floating in the deep end, tossed by waves, carried by currents, but not drowning."  In a singular account of battling Alzheimer's Disease, Patti Davis, daughter of late President Ronald and Mrs. Nancy Reagan,  eloquently weaves personal anecdotes with practical advice tailored specifically for the often-over-looked caregiver.  After losing her father to Alzheimer's, Davis founded Beyond Alzheimer's,  a support group for family members and friends of Alzheimer's patients.  Drawing on those challenging years, Davis reveals the struggles and surprising gifts of this cruel disease that affects more than 6 million Americans of all ages. 

From the challenges of navigating disorientation to the moments when guilt and resentments creep in, readers are guided gently through slow-burning grief.  Along the way, Davis,  who is the author of numerous books including The Long Goodbye that The Friends proudly featured at an Open Mind program in 2012.   Beyond Alzheimer's is now licensed at Geisinger Medical Center in Pennsylvania and the Cleveland Clinic in Los Vegas.

Linda Ercoli, Ph.D., will join Ms. Davis in discussion.  Dr. Ercoli , a clinical psychologist with expertise in geriatrics, dementia, cognition in cancer, and the neuropsychology of aging, is the Interim Director of the UCLA Longevity Center.  She is a Health Sciences Clinical Professor and the Director of Geriatric Psychology in the Department of Psychiatry and Biobehavioral Sciences at the Semel Institute.  Dr. Ercoli served as faculty co-facilitator for Ms. Davis's Beyond Alzheimer's group at UCLA. 

Tuesday, October 19

 5:00 - 6:00 PM PT

Registration is required for this free live private Zoom event.

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For questions email WKelman@mednet.ucla.edu

VIRTUAL OPEN MIND

 

Open Mind Lecture

How to Raise Kids Who Aren't Assholes

Melinda Wenner Moyer with Robin Berman, MD

How to Raise Kids Who Aren't Assholes is a clear, actionable, sometimes humorous (but always science-based) guide for parents on how to shape their kids into honest, kind, generous, confident, independent, and resilient people...who just might save the world one day.

As an award-winning science journalist, Melinda Wenner Moyer was regularly asked to investigate and address all kinds of parenting questions: how to potty train, when and whether to get vaccines, and how to help kids sleep through the night. But as Melinda's children grew, she found that one huge area was ignored in the realm of parenting advice: how do we make sure our kids don't grow up to be assholes?

On social media, in the news, and from the highest levels are government, kids are increasingly getting the message that being selfish, obnoxious and cruel is okay. Hate crimes among children and teens are rising, while compassion among teens has been dropping. We know, of course, that young people have the capacity for great empathy, resilience, and action, and we all want to bring up kids who will help build a better tomorrow. But how do we actually do this? How do we raise children who are kind, considerate, and ethical inside and outside the home, who will grow into adults committed to making the world a better place?

How to Raise Kids Who Aren't Assholes is a deeply researched, evidence-based primer that provides a fresh, often surprising perspective on parenting issues, from toddlerhood through the teenage years. First, Melinda outlines the traits we want our children to possess--including honesty, generosity, and antiracism--and then she provides scientifically-based strategies that will help parents instill those characteristics in their kids. Learn how to raise the kind of kids you actually want to hang out with--and who just might save the world.

Psychiatrist and parenting expert, Robin Berman, MD, will join Melinda Wenner Moyer in conversation. Dr. Berman is an associate professor of psychiatry at the David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, a founding board member of the Resnick Neuropsychiatric Hospital at UCLA, and an advisory board member of Matthew McConaughey’s Just Keep Livin Foundation. She is also the author of Permission to Parent: How to Raise Your Child with Love & Limits.

Thursday, November 4

 5:00 - 6:00 PM PT

Registration is required for this free live private Zoom event.

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For questions email WKelman@mednet.ucla.edu

ABOUT US

The Friends of the Semel Institute for Neuroscience and
Human Behavior at UCLA is dedicated to improving the lives of people with mental illness by supporting research to advance innovative treatments and sponsoring educational programs to raise awareness and erase stigma.*

The Friends of the Semel Institute for Neuroscience and Human Behavior
760 Westwood Plaza C7-463
Los Angeles, CA 90095

Email: wkelman@mednet.ucla.edu

Phone: 310 825-3119
 

* The Friends of the Semel Institute is a 501(c)(3)  volunteer organization under the auspices of the UCLA Foundation.