Registration for Open Mind/#WOW events will be available one month prior to the event. Invitations will be sent to everyone on The Friends mailing list. To join our mailing list, email Wendy Kelman at: wkelman@mednet.ucla.edu

VIRTUAL OPEN MIND

 

Open Mind Lecture
Modern Madness: An Owner's Manual

Terri Cheney

Terri Cheney ripped the covers off her secret battle with bipolar disorder in her New York Times bestselling memoir, Manic. Now, in this "stigma-buster" and "must-read", she blends a gripping narrative with practical advice (Elyn Saks).
 
Cheney flips mental illness inside out, exposing the visceral story of the struggles, stigma, relationship dilemmas, treatments, and recovery techniques she and others have encountered. Sometimes humorous, sometimes harrowing, Modern Madness is the ultimate owner's manual on mental illness, breaking this complex subject down into readily understandable concepts like Instructions for Use, Troubleshooting, Maintenance, and Warranties.
 
Whether you have a diagnosis, love or work with someone who does, or are just trying to understand this emerging phenomenon of our times, Modern Madness is a courageous clarion call for acceptance, both personal and public. With her candid and riveting writing, Cheney delivers more than heartbreak; she promises hope.
 
Terri Cheney is the author of the New York Times bestseller Manic: A Memoir, which was translated into eight foreign languages. Terri's writings and commentary about bipolar disorder have also been featured in the New York Times, the Los Angeles Times, the Huffington Post, NPR, and countless articles and popular blogs, including her own ongoing blog for Psychology Today, which has over one million views.
 
Once a successful entertainment attorney representing the likes of Michael Jackson and Quincy Jones, Terri now devotes her advocacy skills to the cause of destigmatizing mental illness. She is a member of the Board of Directors of the Saks Institute for Mental Health Law, Policy, and Ethics at USC, and the Honorary Board of Directors of the International Bipolar Foundation. She also served on the Community Advisory Board of the UCLA Mood Disorders Research Program. She currently lives in Los Angeles.
 
Michael Gitlin, M.D, Distinguished Professor of Clinical Psychiatry, Director, Adult Division of Psychiatry, Director, Mood Disorders Clinic Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA will join Terri Cheney in discussion.

Thursday, November 12, 2020

5:00 PM - 6PM PT

Registration is required for this free live private Zoom event.

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For questions email WKelman@mednet.ucla.edu

VIRTUAL OPEN MIND

 

Open Mind Lecture
Inside the Robe - A Judge's Candid Tale of Criminal Justice in America

 Judge Katherine Mader (Ret.)

Inside the Robe shines a bright spotlight into the hidden folds of the judging world. The old saw is that judges merely “follow the law.” Yet following the law can produce wildly different results depending upon each judge’s background, politics, and life experiences. Even the courthouse floor to which a case is assigned can mean the difference between prison and freedom.

From her perch behind the bench, Judge Mader witnesses a parade of drug addicts, gang members, mentally ill defendants, pricey private attorneys, jaded prosecutors, and true-believer public defenders. Never before has the judging profession been laid bare for all to see.

Judge Katherine Mader spent two decades as a judge in a criminal court, was the LAPD’s first inspector general, a prosecutor in two murder-for-hire trials, and a defense attorney who successfully argued to spare the life of the Hillside Strangler.

Jonathan Sherin, M.D., Ph.D., Director, Los Angeles County Department of Mental Health will join Judge Mader in discussion.

Elyn Saks, Ph.D, Orrin B. Evans Distinguished Professor of Law, Psychology, and Psychiatry and the Behavioral Sciences, USC Gould School of Law will moderate the discussion 

Wednesday, November 18, 2020

Program begins at 5:00 PM PT

Registration is required for this free live private Zoom event.

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For questions email WKelman@mednet.ucla.edu

VIRTUAL OPEN MIND

 

Open Mind/#WOW Film Screening and Discussion
The Weight of Gold

Brett Rapkin

Please join The Friends of the Semel Institute for Neuroscience and Human Behavior at UCLA and the Resnick Neuropsychiatric Hospital Board of Advisors for this special Open Mind/#WOW film screening and discussion.

 

The Weight of Gold is an HBO Sports documentary exploring the mental health challenges that Olympic athletes often face. The film comes during a time when the COVID-19 pandemic has postponed the 2020 Tokyo Games — the first such postponement in Olympic history — and greatly exacerbated mental health issues. 

The film seeks to inspire discussion about mental health issues, encourage people to seek help, and highlight the need for readily available support. It features accounts from Olympic athletes who share their own struggles with mental health issues, including Michael Phelps, Apolo Ohno, Shaun White, Lolo Jones, Gracie Gold, Katie Uhlaender, Bode Miller, David Boudia, Jeremy Bloom, Sasha Cohen, and, posthumously, Steven Holcomb and Jeret "Speedy" Peterson (via his mother, Linda Peterson).

 

Our Open Mind/#WOW program will feature clips from this critically acclaimed documentary film interspersed with a  panel discussion featuring:   filmmaker Brett Rapkin; Ice Skater Sasha Cohen, Olympic silver medalist featured in the film;  and Talin Babikian, Ph.D. Dr. Babikian is Associate Clinical Professor in the Division of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry at the David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA and Associate Director of BrainSPORT at UCLA, an inter-departmental and multi-disciplinary program studying and treating brain injuries — including concussions — in youth and professional athletes, where she oversees the Sports Neuropsychology Fellowship training program.  She is actively involved in research using novel neuroimaging techniques to understand neurocognitive outcomes and the course of repair and recovery following a brain injury in childhood, as well as the role of mental health risk and resilience factors in outcomes following injury.  She has authored and presented several publications on this topic in journals, book chapters, and professional seminars nationally and internationally.

Tuesday, December 1, 2020

 5:00 - 6:15 PM PT

Registration is required for this free live private Zoom event.

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For questions email WKelman@mednet.ucla.edu

VIRTUAL OPEN MIND

 

Open Mind Lecture
The Unapologetic Guide to Black Mental Health

Rheeda Walker, Ph.D.

Rheeda Walker, Ph.D's new book explore Black mental health in today's world, the forces that have undermined mental health progress for African Americans, and what needs to happen for African Americans to heal psychological distress, find community, and undo years of stigma and marginalization in order to access effective mental health care 

Gail Wyatt, Ph.D. will join Dr. Walker in discussion. Dr. Wyatt is Professor, Dept. of Psychiatry & Biobehavioral Sciences at UCLA; Director, UCLA Sexual Health Program; Director, Center for Culture, Trauma and Mental Health Disparities; Co-Director, HIV/AIDS, Substance Abuse and Trauma Training Program (HA-STTP);
Co-Director, South Africa Center for Chronic Mental Disorders
Co-Director, Bio Behavioral Approaches to Reduce Effects of Trauma on Mental and Physical Health and Cognitions

Wednesday, December 9, 2020

Program begins at 5:00 PM PT

Registration is required for this free live private Zoom event.

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For questions email WKelman@mednet.ucla.edu

VIRTUAL OPEN MIND

 

Open Mind Lecture
The Beauty of What Remains

Rabbi Steve Leder

From the author of the bestselling More Beautiful Than Before comes an inspiring book about loss based on his most popular sermon.

As the senior rabbi of one of the largest synagogues in the world, Steve Leder has learned over and over again the many ways death teaches us how to live and love more deeply by showing us not only what is gone but also the beauty of what remains.

This inspiring and comforting book takes us on a journey through the experience of loss that is fundamental to everyone. Yet even after having sat beside thousands of deathbeds, Steve Leder the rabbi was not fully prepared for the loss of his own father. It was only then that Steve Leder the son truly learned how loss makes life beautiful by giving it meaning and touching us with love that we had not felt before.

Enriched by Rabbi Leder's irreverence, vulnerability, and wicked sense of humor, this heartfelt narrative is filled with laughter and tears, the wisdom of millennia and modernity, and, most of all, an unfolding of the profound and simple truth that in loss we gain more than we ever imagined.

Pre-order  your copy of The Beauty of What Remains now. 

About the Author
Steve Leder is the senior rabbi of Wilshire Boulevard Temple in Los Angeles. After receiving his degree in writing and graduating cum laude from Northwestern University, and spending time studying at Trinity College, Oxford University, Leder received a master's degree in Hebrew letters in 1986 and rabbinical ordination in 1987 from Hebrew Union College. He is the author of three books: The Extraordinary Nature of Ordinary Things, More Money Than God: Living a Rich Life Without Losing Your Soul, and the bestseller More Beautiful Than Before: How Suffering Transforms Us.

Monday, January 11, 2021

Program begins at 5:00 PM PT

Registration is required for this free live private Zoom event.

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For questions email WKelman@mednet.ucla.edu

VIRTUAL OPEN MIND

 

Open Mind Lecture

Tomboy:  The Surprising History And Future of Girls Who Dare To Be Different

Lisa Selin Davis

In TOMBOY, Lisa Selin Davis recounts the history, science and psychology of girls who defied gender expectations—and looks at the possibilities for their future. Her book chronicles the evolution of the pink/blue divide that rules modern childhood; the reasons some girls straddle or cross that divide; and who those girls grow up to be, including the relationship between childhood gender non-conformity and LGBTQ identities. Interspersed with profiles of many different kinds of tomboys, TOMBOY asks why tomboys were so popular at other times in history, where they've gone, and what we've lost, and gained, without them.

Lisa Selin Davis is the author of the novel BELLY, the young adult novel LOST STARS, and hundreds of articles, op-eds and essays. She has written for The New York Times, The Washington Post, The Wall Street Journal, Time, Salon, CNN and many other publications. TOMBOY, her first non-fiction book, sprung from several viral op-eds about gender for The New York Times. She lives in Brooklyn, NY with her family.

Yalda T. Uhis, Ph.D., will join Ms. Davis in conversation.  Dr. Uhis is the Founder and Executive Director of Scholars & Storytellers.  Dr. Uhis is an internationally recognized, award-winning research scientist, educator, and author, studying how media affect young people.  In her former career, she was a senior movie executive at MGM and Sony.  She received her Ph.D. in Developmental Psychology at UCLA.

Tuesday January 26, 2021

5-6 pm PT

Registration is required for this free live private Zoom event.

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For questions email WKelman@mednet.ucla.edu

VIRTUAL OPEN MIND

 

Open Mind Documentary
Orchestrating Change

ORCHESTRATING CHANGE is the feature documentary that tells the inspiring story of the only orchestra in the world created by and for people living with mental illness and those who support them. Me2/Orchestra’s mission is to erase stigma in both the mental health community and through exhilarating concerts to mainstream audiences. Me2/Orchestra’s transformative work creates a stigma-free environment through compassion, acceptance and beautiful music.

 

With compelling characters, striking animation, magnificent music, even humor, "Orchestrating Change" shows what living with a mental illness is really like. The film challenges audiences to reconsider their preconceived notions about mental illness and for those living with a diagnosis, it is empowering. The orchestra is truly changing the lives of these musicians (and audiences) in ways they never imagined. The film culminates in a concert at a major venue that is a triumph for everyone but, especially for Me2/ co-founder and conductor, Ronald Braunstein. Braunstein was on the trajectory to being one of the world’s leading conductors until his diagnosis of bi-polar disorder was disclosed. Before Me2/Orchestra, he thought he might never conduct again.  

 

ME2/ORCHESTRA BIOS-PANELISTS

 

Ronald Braunstein, the Music Director of Me2/Orchstra, received his musical background at The Juilliard School, Salzburg Mozarteum, Fontainbleau, and the Tanglewood Music Center. Immediately following graduation from Juilliard, he won the Gold Medal in the Herbert von Karajan International Conducting Competition and spent the following four years mentoring with Mr. Karajan. He has conducted the San Francisco Symphony, Oslo Philharmonic, Auckland Philharmonia, Israel Sinfonietta, Tokyo Symphony and Stuttgart Radio Orchestra. Mr. Braunstein was diagnosed with bipolar disorder in 1985. He launched Me2/ because of his desire to support others who struggle to maintain good mental health.

 

Caroline Whiddon, the Executive Director of Me2/Orchestra, has more than two decades of experience in orchestra leadership. She is a past Chair of the Youth Orchestra Division of the League of American Orchestras, and a graduate of the Snelling Center for Government’s Vermont Leadership Institute. She received her Bachelor’s degree in French horn performance from the Eastman School of Music. She was first diagnosed with depression and anxiety disorder more than twenty years ago.

 

Braunstein and Whiddon launched Me2/Orchestra in the fall of 2011. They were married in 2013.

 

Margie Friedman & Barbara Multer-Wellin, filmmakers, are both EMMY award winning producers  NS with years of non-fiction television experience They have produced and directed documentaries that have aired on PBS including, the prestigious series, “Independent Lens.” They live in Los Angeles.

 

Sandy Bartlett is a flutist with Me2/Boston.

Wednesday, February 17, 2021

Program begins at 5:00 - 6:15 PM PT

Registration is required for this free live private Zoom event.

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For questions email WKelman@mednet.ucla.edu

VIRTUAL OPEN MIND

 

Open Mind Lecture

Breaking Free of Child Anxiety and OCD

Eli R. Lebowitz, Ph.D.

Please join UCLA's Friends of the Semel Institute and the Resnick Neuropsychiatric Hospital Board of Advisors for an Open Mind/#WOW program on Child Anxiety and OCD with Eli, R. Lebowitz, Ph.D., author of Breaking Free of Child Anxiety and OCD:  A Scientifically Proven Program for Parents. 

 

Parenting an anxious child means facing constant challenges and questions:  When should parents help children avoid anxiety-provoking situations, and when should they encourage them to face their fears? How can parents foster independence while still supporting their children? How can parents reduce the hold their child's anxiety has taken over the entire family?

 

In this welcoming resource for concerned parents, Dr. Lebowitz, Associate Professor in the Yale Child Study Center and Director of the Program for Anxiety Disorders,  offers a complete parent-based treatment program for child and adolescent anxiety.  Parents will learn how to alleviate their children's anxiety by changing the way they themselves respond to their children's symptoms. The book is filled with detailed guidance and practical suggestions along with worksheets to help parents translate the book's suggestion into action. 

 

Professor Eli Lebowitz studies and treats childhood and adolescent anxiety at the Child Study Center at Yale. His research focuses on the development, neurobiology, and treatment of anxiety and related disorders, with special emphasis on family dynamics and the role of parents in these problems. Dr. Lebowitz is the lead investigator on multiple funded research projects, and is the author of research papers, books and chapters on childhood and adolescent anxiety. He is also the father of three great boys.

John Piacentini, Ph.D. ABPP, Professor of Psychiatry and Biobehavioral Sciences at UCLA will join Dr. Lebowitz in discussion.  Dr. Piacentini is the Director, Center for Child Anxiety Resilience Education and Support;

 

Director, UCLA Child OCD, Anxiety and Tic Disorders Program;

Director, UCLA Tourette Association Center of Excellence Semel Institute 

Tuesday, March 9, 2021

 5:00 - 6:00 PM PT

Registration is required for this free live private Zoom event.

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For questions email WKelman@mednet.ucla.edu

VIRTUAL OPEN MIND

 

Open Mind Lecture

And Then They Stopped Talking To Me

Judith Warner

Through the stories of kids and parents in the middle school trenches, New York Times bestselling author Judith Warner reveals why these years are so painful, how parents unwittingly make them worse, and what we all need to do to grow up.
 
The French have a name for the uniquely hellish years between elementary school and high school: l’âge ingrat, or “the ugly age.” Characterized by a perfect storm of developmental changes—physical, psychological, and social—the middle school years are a time of great distress for children and parents alike, marked by hurt, isolation, exclusion, competition, anxiety, and often outright cruelty. Some of this is inevitable; there are intrinsic challenges to early adolescence. But these years are harder than they need to be, and Judith Warner believes that adults are complicit.
 
With deep insight and compassion, Warner walks us through a new understanding of the role that middle school plays in all our lives. She argues that today’s helicopter parents are overly concerned with status and achievement—in some ways a residual effect of their own middle school experiences—and that this worsens the self-consciousness, self-absorption, and social “sorting” so typical of early adolescence.
 
Tracing a century of research on middle childhood and bringing together the voices of social scientists, psychologists, educators, and parents, Warner’s book shows how adults can be moral role models for children, making them more empathetic, caring, and resilient. She encourages us to start treating middle schoolers as the complex people they are, holding them to high standards of kindness, and helping them see one another as more than “jocks and mean girls, nerds and sluts.”
 
Part cultural critique and part call to action, this essential book unpacks one of life’s most formative periods and shows how we can help our children not only survive it but thrive.

Judith Warner is the author of the New York Times bestsellers Perfect Madness: Motherhood in the Age of Anxiety and Hillary Clinton: The Inside Story, as well as the award-winning We’ve Got Issues: Children and Parents in the Age of Medication which she spoke about at a previous Open Mind event. A senior fellow at the Center for American Progress, Warner has been a frequent contributor to The New York Times, where she wrote the popular Domestic Disturbances column, as well as numerous other publications.

Faculty discussant TBA

Tuesday, March 16, 2021

 5:00 - 6:00 PM PT

Registration is required for this free live private Zoom event.

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For questions email WKelman@mednet.ucla.edu

ABOUT US

The Friends of the Semel Institute for Neuroscience and
Human Behavior at UCLA is dedicated to improving the lives of people with mental illness by supporting research to advance innovative treatments and sponsoring educational programs to raise awareness and erase stigma.*

The Friends of the Semel Institute for Neuroscience and Human Behavior
760 Westwood Plaza C7-463
Los Angeles, CA 90095

Email: wkelman@mednet.ucla.edu

Phone: 310 825-3119
 

* The Friends of the Semel Institute is a 501(c)(3)  volunteer organization under the auspices of the UCLA Foundation.