Registration for Open Mind/#WOW events will be available one month prior to the event. Invitations will be sent to everyone on The Friends mailing list. To join our mailing list, email Wendy Kelman at: wkelman@mednet.ucla.edu

VIRTUAL OPEN MIND

 

Open Mind Film Screening
BEDLAM

Kenneth Paul Rosenberg, M.D.

Please join UCLA’s Friends of the Semel institute and the Resnick Neuropsychiatric Hospital Board of Advisors for an Open Mind/#WOW film screening of the groundbreaking documentary  Bedlam...An Intimate Journey into America's Mental Health Care Crisis by Kenneth Paul Rosenberg, M.D.

Bedlam is set in Los Angeles and is the first major documentary to explore the crisis in the care of severely mentally-ill citizens. The film tracks individual stories of mentally-ill patients caught on an endless merry-go-round of ineffective care, exposing the anatomy of a broken health care system and gives us an inside look at the historical, political, and economic forces that have resulted in the greatest social crisis of the twenty-first century.

Over the course of seven years, Dr. Rosenberg spoke with hundreds of people about severe mental illness, including patients, family members, and world experts. The culmination of that inquiry, Bedlam, explores myriad roadblocks to care: the lack of medical research, the paucity of new treatments, a profound shortage of inpatient beds, the enduring stigma, and our disabling shame.

In this special Open Mind/#WOW program, we will screen the first half of Bedlam, followed by the discussion, and then the conclusion of the film. The entire program will run for approximately two hours.

PANEL DISCUSSANTS:

Judge Songhai Armstead is the Executive Director, Alternatives to Incarceration Initiative/County of Los Angeles (Measure J). Judge Armstead, a longtime advocate for the underserved and an innovator within Los Angeles County’s justice system, was selected to head Los Angeles County’s groundbreaking Alternatives to Incarceration Initiative (ATI) beginning in September 2020. As the office’s first executive director, she oversees implementation of recommendations to make “care first, jails last” a reality in Los Angeles County, coordinating among multiple departments and community stakeholders. 

George Gascon is the recently elected District Attorney of Los Angeles County. He previously served as the District Attorney of San Francisco from 2011-2019, as an Assistant Chief of Police for the LAPD, and Chief of Police in Mesa, Arizona and San Francisco.

Felica Jones, Executive Director, Healthy African American Families. As
the Executive Director at HAAF, Ms Jones is committed to decreasing health disparities in Los Angeles County by addressing the Social Determinants of Health in South Los Angeles and the surrounding communities. Over the past 20 years, Ms. Jones has worked on numerous research projects in various roles from Community Researcher to Co-Investigator, including projects funded by the NIH and PCORI. These projects have addressed such diverse topics as autism, depression, preterm pregnancy, diabetes, and asthma, just to name a few. In addition, she is a co-author on more than 40 peer-reviewed publications and has provided mentorship and training to junior researchers and community members.  She views Community Partnered Participatory Research (CPPR) as a key method for improving community participation in research. Ms. Jones was one of the members of the partnership that received the 2015 UCLA Landmark Program of the Year Award, the 2015 Community Campus Partnerships for Health Award, and the 2014 Joint Team Science Award given by the Association for Clinical and Translational Science and the American Federation for Medical Research for Community Partners in Care, an NIH-funded CPPR project on depression in under-resourced communities. Felica Jones also serves on The Friends
of Semel Board of Directors.

The Honorable Patrick Kennedy served as a Democratic member of the United States House of Representatives from Rhode Island from 1995-2011. During his 16 years in the House, Patrick Kennedy fought to end discrimination against those with mental illness, addiction and other brain diseases. He is best known as the lead sponsor of the landmark Mental Health Parity and Addiction Equity Act. in 2013, he founded the Kennedy Forum, a non-profit organization whose mission is to lead a national dialogue to transform mental health and addiction care.

Kenneth Rosenberg, M.D. is a distinguished fellow of the American Psychiatric Association with a private practice in Manhattan, and clinical associate professor of psychiatry at the New York-Presbyterian / Weill Cornell Medical Center. He is also a Peabody Award-winning documentary filmmaker.

Jonathan E. Sherin, M.D.,Ph.D. is the Director of the Los Angeles County Department of Mental Health. He is a longtime wellbeing advocate who has worked tirelessly throughout his career on behalf of vulnerable populations. As the Director of the LACDMH, he oversees the largest public mental health system in the United States with an annual budget approaching $3 billion.

Tuesday, January 19, 2021

5:00 - 7:00 PM Zoom

Registration is required for this free live private Zoom event.

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For questions email WKelman@mednet.ucla.edu

VIRTUAL OPEN MIND

 

Open Mind Lecture

Tomboy:  The Surprising History And Future of Girls Who Dare To Be Different

Lisa Selin Davis with Yalda Uhls, Ph.D.

Please join UCLA's Friends of the Semel Institute for Neuroscience and Human Behavior and the Resnick Neuropsychiatric Hospital Board of Advisors for an Open Mind/#WOW conversation with Lisa Selin Davis, author of the new critically acclaimed book, Tomboy: The Surprising History and Future of Girls Who Dare to Be Different. Yalda T. Uhls, MBA, Ph.D., Founder and Executive Director of Scholars and Storytellers based at UCLA, will join Ms. Selin Davis in conversation.


 

In Tomboy, Lisa Selin Davis recounts the history, science and psychology of girls who defied gender expectations and looks at the possibilities for their future. Her book chronicles the evolution of the pink/blue divide that rules modern childhood; the reasons some girls straddle or cross that divide; and who those girls grow up to be, including the relationship between childhood gender non-conformity and LGBTQ identities. Interspersed with profiles of many different kinds of tomboys, Tomboy asks why tomboys were so popular at other times in history, where they've gone, and what we've lost, and gained, without them.

 

Lisa Selin Davis is the author of the novel Belly, the young adult novel Lost Stars, and hundreds of articles, op-eds and essays. She has written for The New York Times, The Washington Post, The Wall Street Journal, Time, Salon, CNN and many other publications. Tomboy, her first non-fiction book, sprung from several viral op-eds about gender for The New York Times. She lives in Brooklyn, NY with her family.

 

In addition to being the Founder and Executive Director of Scholars and Storytellers, Dr. Yalda T. Uhis is an internationally recognized, award-winning research scientist, educator, and author, studying how media affect young people. In her former career, she was a senior movie executive at MGM and Sony. She received her Ph.D. in Developmental Psychology at UCLA.

Tuesday January 26, 2021

5-6 pm PT

Registration is required for this free live private Zoom event.

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For questions email WKelman@mednet.ucla.edu

VIRTUAL OPEN MIND

 

Open Mind Lecture
Aging in High Heels

Beverlye Hyman Fead with  Karen Miller, Ph.D.

This is a book that looks at aging in a different way. We’re all gaining more years because of education, new medicines, and information being shared across the world. This book is looking at a longer life with humor, stories and some advice. 

 

"I challenge the way we think about aging. The title, Aging in High Heels, means walking into a room with attitude. You don't really need high heels on, you just have to feel that you do. You have to feel like 'I'm here, I'm relevant, and I have something to say!'"

Beverlye Hyman Fead is a California author, speaker and activist. She was diagnosed with metastasized Stage IV Uteral Stromal Sarcoma in 2002 and given two months to live. Since then, she has written 3 award-winning books, I Can Do This: Living With Cancer and Nana, What's Cancer? and Aging in High Heels ​as well as produced an award-winning short documentary Stage IV, Living With Cancer. Her passion is to speak all over the country on living with cancer, self-esteem and aging. Having lost her grandmother, mother, and both sisters to cancer, Beverlye has devoted a great deal of time to cancer on every level. Beverlye has taken what she has learned from living with Stage IV cancer and has passed it on to people who are aging and have chronic diseases. Her passion now, is not only speaking about cancer and aging, but sharing her knowledge about wellness and the steps to live within a health-span.

 

"I hope to redefine ones 70's, 80's and 90's. It is just a continuation of who you are, nothing more."

She will be in conversation with Karen J. Miller, Ph.D.

Director of Practicum Training at UCLA Medical Center

Director of the Memory Care Program at the UCLA Longevity Center

Health Sciences Clinical Professor of Psychiatry and Biobehavioral Sciences

Tuesday, February 9, 2021

Program begins at 5:00 - 6:00 PM PT

Registration is required for this free live private Zoom event.

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For questions email WKelman@mednet.ucla.edu

VIRTUAL OPEN MIND

 

Open Mind Documentary
Orchestrating Change

ORCHESTRATING CHANGE is the feature documentary that tells the inspiring story of the only orchestra in the world created by and for people living with mental illness and those who support them. Me2/Orchestra’s mission is to erase stigma in both the mental health community and through exhilarating concerts to mainstream audiences. Me2/Orchestra’s transformative work creates a stigma-free environment through compassion, acceptance and beautiful music.

 

With compelling characters, striking animation, magnificent music, even humor, "Orchestrating Change" shows what living with a mental illness is really like. The film challenges audiences to reconsider their preconceived notions about mental illness and for those living with a diagnosis, it is empowering. The orchestra is truly changing the lives of these musicians (and audiences) in ways they never imagined. The film culminates in a concert at a major venue that is a triumph for everyone but, especially for Me2/ co-founder and conductor, Ronald Braunstein. Braunstein was on the trajectory to being one of the world’s leading conductors until his diagnosis of bi-polar disorder was disclosed. Before Me2/Orchestra, he thought he might never conduct again.  

 

ME2/ORCHESTRA BIOS-PANELISTS

 

Ronald Braunstein, the Music Director of Me2/Orchstra, received his musical background at The Juilliard School, Salzburg Mozarteum, Fontainbleau, and the Tanglewood Music Center. Immediately following graduation from Juilliard, he won the Gold Medal in the Herbert von Karajan International Conducting Competition and spent the following four years mentoring with Mr. Karajan. He has conducted the San Francisco Symphony, Oslo Philharmonic, Auckland Philharmonia, Israel Sinfonietta, Tokyo Symphony and Stuttgart Radio Orchestra. Mr. Braunstein was diagnosed with bipolar disorder in 1985. He launched Me2/ because of his desire to support others who struggle to maintain good mental health.

 

Caroline Whiddon, the Executive Director of Me2/Orchestra, has more than two decades of experience in orchestra leadership. She is a past Chair of the Youth Orchestra Division of the League of American Orchestras, and a graduate of the Snelling Center for Government’s Vermont Leadership Institute. She received her Bachelor’s degree in French horn performance from the Eastman School of Music. She was first diagnosed with depression and anxiety disorder more than twenty years ago.

 

Braunstein and Whiddon launched Me2/Orchestra in the fall of 2011. They were married in 2013.

 

Margie Friedman & Barbara Multer-Wellin, filmmakers, are both EMMY award winning producers  NS with years of non-fiction television experience They have produced and directed documentaries that have aired on PBS including, the prestigious series, “Independent Lens.” They live in Los Angeles.

 

Sandy Bartlett is a flutist with Me2/Boston.

Mark Jude Tramo, M.D., Ph.D. will participate as the faculty discussant for this program.  Dr. Tramo is Associate Clinical Professor of Neurology, David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA; Associate Adjunct Professor of Integrative Biology & Physiology, UCLA College of Letters & Science;

Lecturer, Dept of Musicology, UCLA Herb Alpert School of Music; Director, The Institute for Music & Brain Science; Co-Director, University of California Multi-Campus Music Research Initiative (UC MERCI)

Wednesday, February 17, 2021

Program begins at 5:00 - 6:15 PM PT

Registration is required for this free live private Zoom event.

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For questions email WKelman@mednet.ucla.edu

VIRTUAL OPEN MIND

 

Open Mind Lecture

Breaking Free of Child Anxiety and OCD

Eli R. Lebowitz, Ph.D. with John Piacentini, Ph.D.

Please join UCLA's Friends of the Semel Institute and the Resnick Neuropsychiatric Hospital Board of Advisors for an Open Mind/#WOW program on Child Anxiety and OCD with Eli, R. Lebowitz, Ph.D., author of Breaking Free of Child Anxiety and OCD:  A Scientifically Proven Program for Parents. 

 

Parenting an anxious child means facing constant challenges and questions:  When should parents help children avoid anxiety-provoking situations, and when should they encourage them to face their fears? How can parents foster independence while still supporting their children? How can parents reduce the hold their child's anxiety has taken over the entire family?

 

In this welcoming resource for concerned parents, Dr. Lebowitz, Associate Professor in the Yale Child Study Center and Director of the Program for Anxiety Disorders,  offers a complete parent-based treatment program for child and adolescent anxiety.  Parents will learn how to alleviate their children's anxiety by changing the way they themselves respond to their children's symptoms. The book is filled with detailed guidance and practical suggestions along with worksheets to help parents translate the book's suggestion into action. 

 

Professor Eli Lebowitz studies and treats childhood and adolescent anxiety at the Child Study Center at Yale. His research focuses on the development, neurobiology, and treatment of anxiety and related disorders, with special emphasis on family dynamics and the role of parents in these problems. Dr. Lebowitz is the lead investigator on multiple funded research projects, and is the author of research papers, books and chapters on childhood and adolescent anxiety. He is also the father of three great boys.

John Piacentini, Ph.D. ABPP, Professor of Psychiatry and Biobehavioral Sciences at UCLA will join Dr. Lebowitz in discussion.  Dr. Piacentini is the Director, Center for Child Anxiety Resilience Education and Support;

 

Director, UCLA Child OCD, Anxiety and Tic Disorders Program;

Director, UCLA Tourette Association Center of Excellence Semel Institute 

Tuesday, March 9, 2021

 5:00 - 6:00 PM PT

Registration is required for this free live private Zoom event.

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For questions email WKelman@mednet.ucla.edu

VIRTUAL OPEN MIND

 

Open Mind Lecture

And Then They Stopped Talking To Me

Judith Warner

Through the stories of kids and parents in the middle school trenches, New York Times bestselling author Judith Warner reveals why these years are so painful, how parents unwittingly make them worse, and what we all need to do to grow up.
 
The French have a name for the uniquely hellish years between elementary school and high school: l’âge ingrat, or “the ugly age.” Characterized by a perfect storm of developmental changes—physical, psychological, and social—the middle school years are a time of great distress for children and parents alike, marked by hurt, isolation, exclusion, competition, anxiety, and often outright cruelty. Some of this is inevitable; there are intrinsic challenges to early adolescence. But these years are harder than they need to be, and Judith Warner believes that adults are complicit.
 
With deep insight and compassion, Warner walks us through a new understanding of the role that middle school plays in all our lives. She argues that today’s helicopter parents are overly concerned with status and achievement—in some ways a residual effect of their own middle school experiences—and that this worsens the self-consciousness, self-absorption, and social “sorting” so typical of early adolescence.
 
Tracing a century of research on middle childhood and bringing together the voices of social scientists, psychologists, educators, and parents, Warner’s book shows how adults can be moral role models for children, making them more empathetic, caring, and resilient. She encourages us to start treating middle schoolers as the complex people they are, holding them to high standards of kindness, and helping them see one another as more than “jocks and mean girls, nerds and sluts.”
 
Part cultural critique and part call to action, this essential book unpacks one of life’s most formative periods and shows how we can help our children not only survive it but thrive.

Judith Warner is the author of the New York Times bestsellers Perfect Madness: Motherhood in the Age of Anxiety and Hillary Clinton: The Inside Story, as well as the award-winning We’ve Got Issues: Children and Parents in the Age of Medication which she spoke about at a previous Open Mind event. A senior fellow at the Center for American Progress, Warner has been a frequent contributor to The New York Times, where she wrote the popular Domestic Disturbances column, as well as numerous other publications.

Dr. Safiya Umoja Noble , Associate Professor at UCLA in the Department of Information Studies will join Judith Warner in conversation.  Dr. Noble is the Co-Founder and Co-Director of the UCLA Center for Critical Internet Inquiry. She also holds appointments in African American Studies and Gender Studies. She is a Research Associate at the Oxford Internet Institute at the University of Oxford and has been appointed as a Commissioner on the Oxford Commission on AI & Good Governance. She is a board member of the Cyber Civil Rights Initiative, serving those vulnerable to online harassment and serves on the NYU Center Critical Race and Digital Studies advisory board. She is the author of a best-selling book on racist and sexist algorithmic bias in commercial search engines, entitled Algorithms of Oppression: How Search Engines Reinforce Racism which has been widely-reviewed in scholarly and popular publications.

Tuesday, March 16, 2021

 5:00 - 6:00 PM PT

Registration is required for this free live private Zoom event.

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For questions email WKelman@mednet.ucla.edu

VIRTUAL OPEN MIND

 

Open Mind Lecture

Wiser:  The Scientific Roots of Wisdom, Compassion, 

and What Makes Us Good

Dilip Jeste, M.D. in conversation with Shafali Jeste, M.D.

What exactly does it mean to be "wise?" And is it possible to grow―and even accelerate―its unfolding? How do you nurture wisdom within yourself, at any stage in life?   
 

If you seek to be a wiser person―with your family, at work, and in your community―you will not want to miss this special father-daughter Open Mind/#WOW program Wiser,  presented by The Friends of the Semel Institute for Neuroscience and Human Behavior at UCLA and the Resnick Neuropsychiatric Hospital Board of Advisors. 

Dilip Jeste, M.D. is a world-renowned neuropsychiatrist and a pioneer in the exploration of the neurobiology and psychology.  For over two decades, Dr. Jeste, a Professor  of Psychiatry and Neurosciences and Director of the Center for Healthy Aging at the University of California San Diego,  has led the search for the biological and cognitive roots of wisdom. In his new critically acclaimed book Wiser:  The Scientific Roots of Wisdom, Compassion and What Makes Us Good, he shows you how you can take control of your life by increasing your wisdom.
 


Dr. Shafali Jeste, M.D., Pediatric Neurologist and Associate Professor in Psychiatry, Pediatric, and Neurology at the David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, will join her father in discussion.  Dr. Jeste is the recipient of the 2019 Presidential Early Career Award for Scientists and Engineers.  Her research is focused on developing more precise methods for early prediction and diagnosis of neurodevelopmental disorders, including autism, using biomarkers, and other genetic information, with the ultimate goal of improving the timing and targets of treatment for these conditions.

Tuesday, April 13, 2021

 5:00 PM PT

Registration is required for this free live private Zoom event.

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For questions email WKelman@mednet.ucla.edu

VIRTUAL OPEN MIND

 

Open Mind Lecture

Where Reasons End

Professor Yiyun Li with Michael Gitlin M.D.

In this imagined dialogue between mother and child in a timeless world, author Yiyun Li, meets life’s deepest sorrows.  Composed in the months after she lost a child to suicide, Where Reasons End, winner of the 2020 Pen/JeanStein Book Award, trespasses into the space between life and death, as mother and child talk, free from old images and narratives. Deeply moving, these conversations portray the love and complexity in a relationship across generations. Written with great originality and poetic beauty, Where Reasons End confronts inescapable pain, in a moving work suffused with intimacy and fierce love.

Yiyun Li, the author of The Vagrants and other acclaimed books, is the recipient of many awards, including a PEN/Hemingway Award, a PEN/Jean Stein Book Award, a MacArthur Foundation fellowship, and a Windham-Campbell Prize, and was featured in The New Yorker’s “20 Under 40” fiction issue.

Dr. Yiyun Li is also a professor of creative writing at Princeton.  She will be joined in discussion by Dr. Michael Gitlin, Distinguished Professor of Clinical Psychiatry at the UCLA School of Medicine, Director of the Adult Division in the Department of Psychiatry and Medical Director of the Neuropsychiatric Behavioral Health Services and Director of the Mood Disorder Clinical at the Resnick Hospital.

Wednesday, May 12, 2021

 5:00 - 6:00 PM PT

Registration is required for this free live private Zoom event.

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For questions email WKelman@mednet.ucla.edu

VIRTUAL OPEN MIND

 

Open Mind Lecture

The Rabbit Effect

Dr. Kelli Harding with Dr. Daniel Fessler

In the past decade, medicine has seen significant biomedical advances, yet, despite millions of research hours and trillions of dollars, Americans aren’t living longer or healthier lives. In this eye-opening book, Columbia University’s Dr. Kelli Harding asks, what are we missing when it comes to our health? Rabbits offer a clue. In 1978, a seemingly straightforward experiment found that kindness—in the form of an incredibly nurturing researcher who pet and spoke to the lab rabbits as she fed them—made all the difference to health outcomes.

 

Dr. Kelli Harding discovered the rabbits were just the beginning of a much larger story. Decades of research from academic institutions worldwide illustrate that love, friendship, community, life’s purpose, and our environment can have a far greater impact on our health than anything that happens in the doctor’s office.

 

The Rabbit Effect is an eye-opening and inspiring new way to look at our health based on the latest discoveries in the science of compassion, kindness, and human connection. With compelling storytelling and research, Dr. Harding presents an evidence-based framework for you to take charge of your health and happiness.  

 

This book comes at a time when Americans need it most. COVID-19 has made our world smaller, and our interconnectedness clear. The events of 2020 have amplified its message.  The Rabbit Effect offers practical daily tools to improve our health and increase kindness—especially in times that feel so divided. How we treat each other in our day-to-day lives is critical to immune function, metabolism, and the course of illness and how we live, work, and play profoundly impacts our health. 

 

Dr. Kelli Harding is an assistant clinical professor of psychiatry at Columbia University Irving Medical Center and public health expert. She’s a diplomat of the American Board of Psychiatry and Neurology and boarded in the specialty of psychosomatic (mind-body) medicine. Dr. Harding has spent much of her career in the ER at New York-Presbyterian Hospital. A media favorite, she’s appeared on TodayGood Morning America, BBC World, C-SPAN, NPR, and in The New York TimesThe Washington Post, MedscapeOprah.comReaders Digest, and Parents Magazine. Dr. Harding lives in NYC with her husband, Padraic, and three boys (seventh grade, fifth grade, and second grade).

 

Dr. Daniel Fessler, Director of the UCLA Bedari Kindness Center, will join Dr. Harding in conversation.  Dr. Fessler is a Professor of Biological Anthropology at UCLA, working in the fields of evolutionary psychology, evolutionary anthropology and evolutionary medicine. 

Thursday, June 3, 2021

 5:00 - 6:00 PM PT

Registration is required for this free live private Zoom event.

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For questions email WKelman@mednet.ucla.edu

VIRTUAL OPEN MIND

 

Open Mind Lecture

This is Your Brain on Food

Uma Naidoo, M.D.

Dr. Uma Naidoo, a Harvard trained psychiatrist, Professional Chef and Nutrition Specialist is the author of the new book, This is Your Brain on Food released in August 2020. Her niche work is in Nutritional Psychiatry and she is regarded both nationally and internationally as a medical pioneer in this more newly recognized field.

 

In her book, she shows the cutting-edge science explaining the ways in which food contributes to our mental health and how a sound diet can help treat and prevent a wide range of psychological and cognitive health issues from ADHD to anxiety, depression, OCD, and others.

 

Featured in the Wall Street Journal, ABC News, Harvard Health Press, Goop, and many others, Dr Uma has a special interest on the impact of food on mood and other mental health conditions.

 

In her role as a Clinical Scientist, Dr. Naidoo founded and directs the first hospital-based clinical service in Nutritional Psychiatry in the US.  She is the Director of Nutritional and Lifestyle Psychiatry at Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) & Director of Nutritional Psychiatry at the Massachusetts General Hospital Academy while serving on the faculty at Harvard Medical School.

Zhaoping Li, MD, PhD, Professor of Medicine and Director for the UCLA Center for Human Nutrition,  will join Dr. Naidoo in conversation.  Dr. Li is also the Lynda and Stewart Resnick Endowed Chair in Human Nutrition and at the David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA

Thursday, September 9, 2021

 5:00 - 6:00 PM PT

Registration is required for this free live private Zoom event.

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For questions email WKelman@mednet.ucla.edu

VIRTUAL OPEN MIND

 

Open Mind Play

Does This Make Me Look Fat

Cathy Ladman

“Does This Show Make Me Look Fat?” is the story of Cathy Ladman’s lifelong struggle to be perfect in every way – to succeed at school, to be seen at home, and, finally, to attain what she thinks is the perfect body.  But as much as she tries, nothing is ever enough. Faced with the possibility of hospital admission to prevent her from starving herself to death, she begins on a path to learn that “perfect” is not the thing she really wants. 

Thursday, September 23, 2021

 5:00 - 6:00 PM PT

Registration is required for this free live private Zoom event.

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For questions email WKelman@mednet.ucla.edu

VIRTUAL OPEN MIND

 

Open Mind Lecture

He Came In With It

Miriam Feldman

In an idyllic Los Angeles neighborhood, where generations of families enjoy deep roots in old homes, the O’Rourke family fits right in.

 

Miriam and Craig are both artists and their four children carry on the legacy. When their teenage son, Nick, is diagnosed with schizophrenia, a tumultuous decade ensues in whichhe family careens permanently off the conventional course.

 

Like the ten Biblical plagues, they are hit by one catastrophe after another; violence, evictions, arrests, a suicide attempt, a near-drowning, even cancer and a brain tumor play against the backdrop of a wild teenage bacchanal of artmaking and drugs. With no time for hand-wringing, Miriam advances, convinced she can fix everything. This is the story of how mental illness unspools an entire family. As Miriam fights to reclaim her son from the
ruthless, invisible enemy, we are given an unflinching view into a world few could imagine. He Came In With It is the legacy of, and for, her son Nick.

Tuesday, October 5, 2021

 5:00 - 6:00 PM PT

Registration is required for this free live private Zoom event.

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For questions email WKelman@mednet.ucla.edu

VIRTUAL OPEN MIND

 

Open Mind Lecture

How to Raise Kids Who Aren't Assholes

Melinda Wenner Moyer

How to Raise Kids Who Aren't Assholes is a clear, actionable, sometimes humorous (but always science-based) guide for parents on how to shape their kids into honest, kind, generous, confident, independent, and resilient people...who just might save the world one day.

As an award-winning science journalist, Melinda Wenner Moyer was regularly asked to investigate and address all kinds of parenting questions: how to potty train, when and whether to get vaccines, and how to help kids sleep through the night. But as Melinda's children grew, she found that one huge area was ignored in the realm of parenting advice: how do we make sure our kids don't grow up to be assholes?

On social media, in the news, and from the highest levels are government, kids are increasingly getting the message that being selfish, obnoxious and cruel is okay. Hate crimes among children and teens are rising, while compassion among teens has been dropping. We know, of course, that young people have the capacity for great empathy, resilience, and action, and we all want to bring up kids who will help build a better tomorrow. But how do we actually do this? How do we raise children who are kind, considerate, and ethical inside and outside the home, who will grow into adults committed to making the world a better place?

How to Raise Kids Who Aren't Assholes is a deeply researched, evidence-based primer that provides a fresh, often surprising perspective on parenting issues, from toddlerhood through the teenage years. First, Melinda outlines the traits we want our children to possess--including honesty, generosity, and antiracism--and then she provides scientifically-based strategies that will help parents instill those characteristics in their kids. Learn how to raise the kind of kids you actually want to hang out with--and who just might save the world.

Psychiatrist and parenting expert, Robin Berman, MD, will join Melinda Wenner Moyer in conversation. Dr. Berman is an associate professor of psychiatry at the David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, a founding board member of the Resnick Neuropsychiatric Hospital at UCLA, and an advisory board member of Matthew McConaughey’s Just Keep Livin Foundation. She is also the author of Permission to Parent: How to Raise Your Child with Love & Limits.

Thursday, November 4, 2021

 5:00 - 6:00 PM PT

Registration is required for this free live private Zoom event.

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For questions email WKelman@mednet.ucla.edu

ABOUT US

The Friends of the Semel Institute for Neuroscience and
Human Behavior at UCLA is dedicated to improving the lives of people with mental illness by supporting research to advance innovative treatments and sponsoring educational programs to raise awareness and erase stigma.*

The Friends of the Semel Institute for Neuroscience and Human Behavior
760 Westwood Plaza C7-463
Los Angeles, CA 90095

Email: wkelman@mednet.ucla.edu

Phone: 310 825-3119
 

* The Friends of the Semel Institute is a 501(c)(3)  volunteer organization under the auspices of the UCLA Foundation.